The Atlantic

How to Convince Transit Riders Their Wait Wasn’t So Bad

Plant trees.
Source: Brian Snyder / Reuters

Anyone who’s ever relied on public transportation knows that waiting can be the worst part. Even with apps that provide arrival estimates, riders can still find themselves at a loss—straining their eyes in hopes of seeing train lights in the distance, or furiously checking phones while wondering what on earth is holding up a delayed bus.

But a new study suggests that the feelings of

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