NPR

Capital Gazette Shooting 'Complete Gut Punch To Journalists,' NPR Media Correspondent Says

The shooting at The Capital Gazette in Annapolis has reignited conversation about recent political attacks on journalists and the media.
Steve Schuh, county executive of Anne Arundel County, holds a copy of The Capital Gazette near the scene of a shooting at the newspaper's office, Friday, June 29, 2018, in Annapolis, Md. A man armed with smoke grenades and a shotgun attacked journalists in the building Thursday, killing several people before police quickly stormed the building and arrested him, police and witnesses said. (Patrick Semansky/AP)

A shooting in the newsroom of The Capital Gazette in Annapolis on Thursday left five people dead and several more seriously injured. It’s also reignited conversation about recent political attacks on journalists and the media.

The shooting is “a complete gut punch to journalists,” NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik says. One of the victims, Rob Hiaasen, was a colleague of Folkenflik’s for several years at The Baltimore Sun.

“Papers like Capital — understaffed, underpaid —) tells ‘s Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson of his experience working in the region. “I got to be honest, it’s a very hard story for me.”

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