Los Angeles Times

Fewer Americans spend their final days in hospital and more are dying at home

The American way of dying seems to have become less frantic, desperate and expensive.

That's the upshot of a new study that finds that seniors insured by Medicare who died in 2015 were less likely to do so in a hospital and more likely to pass away in a home or other community setting than those who died in 2000.

The new research also showed that the proportion of American seniors who were admitted to the intensive care unit during their final month

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