NPR

Raising Kids Who Want To Read — Even During The Summer

Long summer days leave lots of time for books. What's the best way to encourage kids to take advantage of that time?
Source: LA Johnson

This piece combines two interviews from 2015 and 2016.

You sneak them into backpacks and let them commingle with the video games (hoping some of the latter's appeal will rub off). You lay them around the kids' beds like stepping stones through the Slough of Despond and, for good measure, Vitamix them to an imperceptible pulp for the occasional smoothie.

Books are everywhere in your house, and yet ... they're not being consumed. Because it's summer, and kids have so many other things they'd rather do.

Daniel Willingham, a psychologist at the University of Virginia and the author of , doesn't champion reading for the obvious reasons — not because research suggests

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