Popular Science

Beauty vitamins promise shinier hair, stronger nails, and suppler skin, but do they work?

Cosmetic supplements have a lot of claims, but not enough science.
vitamins and pills

Beauty pills and gummy vitamins claim to improve skin, hair, and nails but they only work for people who have a true deficiency.

For centuries, women have turned to creams, superfoods, and potions for the sake of beauty. But today, an increasing number of people are instead popping a pill—taking so called beauty vitamins, ingestible capsules, or gummies that all promise to improve their hair, skin, and nails. But the science behind this method is not so clearcut. Like far too many attempted beauty cures before it, most of these vitamin regimens come with tall claims, lowly research to back them up, and occasionally, the potential to cause harm.

There’s no question that this beauty trend is taking hold. Walk into any cosmetic store and the shelves are stocked full of a variety of pills all with similar hair, skin, and nail improving claims. Recent research reflects this. According to a article last year, about 20 percent in 2016 and expected to grow to $220 billion in 2022.

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