The Atlantic

A Game-Changing AI Tool for Tracking Animal Movements

Scientists are already using it to study octopuses, electric fish, surgical robots, and racehorses.
Source: Mackenzie Mathis

In a video, a rodent reaches out and grabs a morsel of food, while small, colored dots highlight the positions of its knuckles. In another clip, a racehorse gallops along a track; again, small, colored dots track the position of its body parts. In a third video, two human dancers circle around each other as those same dots unfailingly follow the sometimes fluid, sometimes jerky movements of their limbs.

These videos are showcases for , a tool that can automatically track and label the body parts of moving animals. Developed this year by and , a pair of married

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from The Atlantic

The Atlantic4 min readPolitics
The Window for Brexit May Already Have Closed
Parliament is delaying Johnson’s plan—and generational replacement has undercut its support.
The Atlantic3 min read
Nothing Will Persuade White Evangelicals to Support Impeachment
New polling suggests that Trump’s base is totally unified behind the president, no matter what investigations might reveal.
The Atlantic7 min readPolitics
The ‘Messy and Angry’ Prospect of Ireland Reunifying
Changing demographics and sentiment signal that the possibility of a reunion is increasing. Yet few are prepared for what that means.