NPR

Q&A: Wider Knowledge About Cancer Prevention Would Reduce U.S. Deaths

Cancer death rates remain high for some groups of people, including African-Americans, despite general gains made in recent decades. The American Cancer Society has ideas about reducing the gaps.
"Our health care systems need to adjust a little to try to get knowledge about cancer prevention to everybody," says Dr. Otis Brawley, chief medical and scientific officer of the American Cancer Society. Source: American Cancer Society

There has been a lot of progress in the fight against cancer. Cancer death rates have dropped, but the gains haven't been experienced equally.

Cancer death rates remain high for some minorities, including African-Americans. There are geographic differences, too. Death rates for breast and colorectal cancers have declined faster in New England than in other parts of the country. Cancer is also more likely to be fatal for people living in poverty or those without a college degree.

Dr. Otis Brawley, chief medical and scientific officer of the American Cancer Society, says many cancer deaths could be averted if these demographic gaps were narrowed. Hestarting Tuesday.

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from NPR

NPR3 min read
A Very Naughty Boy: Remembering Monty Python's Terry Jones
Comedian, author and filmmaker Terry Jones has died at the age of 77 after suffering from dementia. As part of Monty Python, he was known for his drag characters and for co-writing the "Spam" sketch.
NPR4 min readPolitics
Election Security Boss: Threats To 2020 Are Now Broader, More Diverse
In an exclusive interview with NPR, election threats executive Shelby Pierson says more nations may attempt more types of interference in the U.S.
NPR3 min readPolitics
Public Transport In Wuhan Suspended Due To Coronavirus Concerns
It's the most dramatic change in the wake of the newly discovered virus, which has so far infected some 500 individuals and killed 17. Will it help stem the outbreak?