The Guardian

The Trump era won't last for ever. But we must do our part to end it | Rebecca Solnit

I see the rage all around me, but painful emotions can coexist with activism – and millions of Americans are stepping up
‘People are ready. They are ready for someone, something, to pull the alarm so that they can step it up. They are where my hope resides now.’ Photograph: Eugene Garcia/EPA

I keep the newspaper clipping inside a Milan Kundera novel: it shows demonstrators in Prague in 1989, one of them carrying a badly chipped bust of Stalin around whose neck hangs a placard that says nic netrvá věčně: nothing lasts forever. It’s not a war cry, nor a prophesy, but a bald statement of fact at the moment when the Soviet bloc Stalin had been critical in establishing was falling apart and Czechoslovakia was liberating itself.

It must have seemed like forever to those who lived under totalitarianism until all of a sudden “forever” crashed and burned. People worked to make it so at terrible risk; some were imprisoned, or otherwise punished. Some died. They worked without knowledge of how and when

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

Related Interests

More from The Guardian

The Guardian2 min readAmerican Government
Trump Feared Democrats Would Replace Biden With Michelle Obama, Book Claims
Donald Trump called Joe Biden a “mental retard” during the 2020 election, a new book says, but was reluctant to attack him too strongly for fear the Democrats would replace him with Hillary Clinton or Michelle Obama. Biden went on to beat Trump by mo
The Guardian3 min read
How A Ghostly Outline Revealed The Secret Of Modigliani’s Lost Lover
No one wants to be reminded of a failed relationship by having the ex’s portrait hanging around. After Amedeo Modigliani and his lover, Beatrice Hastings, broke up, the Italian artist is thought to have obliterated her memory by painting another woma
The Guardian5 min readCrime & Violence
How The FBI And Australian Police Gained A Front Seat View Of Underworld Workings In 90 Countries
It was mid-2018 when a convicted narcotics importer met with FBI agents from San Diego and made them a tantalising offer: in exchange for a possible reduction in the importer’s sentence on other charges, would the bureau like a backdoor into the encr