Popular Science

Turning water into oxygen in zero gravity could mean easier trips to Mars

A real breath of fresh air.
Artist’s rendering of a Mars artificial gravity transfer vehicle

Artist’s rendering of a Mars artificial gravity transfer vehicle.

NASA

Space agencies and private companies already have advanced plans to send humans to Mars in the next few years—ultimately establishing settlements there. And with a growing number of discoveries of Earth-like planets around nearby stars, long-distance space travel has never seemed more exciting.

However, it isn’t easy for humans to for sustained periods of time. One of the main challenges with long-distance space flight is transporting enough oxygen for astronauts to breathe and enough fuel to power complex electronics. Sadly, there’s only little oxygen available in

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from Popular Science

Popular Science3 min readSociety
Your Annual Checkup Could Soon Include Screening For Illicit Drug Use
In a draft document released this week, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF), which develops guidelines for health screening tests, is recommending that physicians also screen for illicit drug use in patients over the age of 18.
Popular Science3 min read
New Graphic FDA Warnings Aim To Scare Smokers With The Consequences Of Their Habit
An image of bloody urine isn’t exactly cool. It’s not the kind of thing you’d want to see on your smoke break, right when you’re supposed to be doing something you enjoy. And that’s exactly why the Food and Drug Administration wants to put pictures o
Popular Science4 min read
The Best Instant Cameras
Instant film is unpredictable and fun, these are some of our favorite cameras currently available.