Popular Science

Here’s what you can do if your social media post gets taken down

You can appeal when your social media content gets taken down, but you need to know where to look.
Statue butt

Unacceptable.

Facebook

Some social media-content is easy to evaluate. Cute cat pictures? Great. Helpful how-to videos? Perfect. Unfortunately, parsing posts gets a lot more complicated when the content flowing through the tubes of social media involves news. Earlier this week, the House Judiciary Committee brought in representatives from Twitter, YouTube, and Facebook to discuss the companies’ policies and practices for evaluating and moderating content (mostly political in nature) and the internet scourge that is fake news.

During the hearing, Facebook’s rep, Monika Bickert, mentioned that

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