Chicago Tribune

With an insatiable demand for data centers, some are worried Illinois can't keep up

Entering the data center that occupies the former Chicago Sun-Times' printing facility is like walking through the set of a James Bond film.

There's a 10-foot-tall steel fence encircling the property on the Lower West Side. There are gates, buzzers, a security desk, cameras and doors that use fingerprints as their key. The final entry into the room full of locked server cages requires an iris scan.

Spurred by society's ever-increasing dependence on the cloud, demand for data centers is insatiable. The Chicago area ranks third in the country for data center capacity, but an increasing number of states, including neighboring Iowa, are wooing the facilities with tax incentives.

In contrast, there are no incentives available in Illinois specifically for data centers, which can bring economic benefits like improved power grids and telecommunications systems. Those upgrades in turn help attract more companies and more jobs to Chicago. Some worry

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