Inc.

WIN THE BREAKUP

HOW TO BUY OUT A PARTNER AND SAVE YOUR BUSINESS

Few of us go into business with someone else and expect the relationship to end. But many founder breakups are inevitable. Partners can disagree over strategy or money or how fast the business should grow. Tension can develop between once-close friends and colleagues. Sometimes one partner simply decides he or she doesn’t have what it takes to be an entrepreneur.

Within a year of starting a business, 10 percent of co-founders end their relationship, and within four years, 45 percent break up, according

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