Popular Science

What I learned from getting covered in whale snot

Scientists can learn a lot from the substances in whale blow. To collect that spray, one research developed a special tool: a drone dubbed SnotBot.
whale spouting water below drone

Hacks.

Britt Spencer

Iain Kerr, CEO and whale biologist at Ocean Alliance

Ocean pollution, habitat loss, and collisions with ships have helped land on the vulnerable species

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