The Atlantic

Trump Made Socialism Great Again

The president has disrupted democratic complacency, and that’s a good thing.
Source: Jonathan Bachman / Reuters

The election of Trump—and the populist upsurge he helped encourage—has confirmed that politics is no longer the art of the possible, but the improbable. If Trump can win the highest office in the land, then why can’t the rest of us run for something, too? Why shouldn’t a 33-year old Egyptian-American named Abdul run for Michigan governor? Why shouldn’t a 28-year old, who was only a bartender a year ago, defeat a Democratic establishment stalwart? And why shouldn’t that person say, without shame or apology, that she’s a socialist?

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s primary-election victory, coming on the heels of Bernie Sanders’s insurgent presidential campaign, has thrust “socialism” into the center of the American political conversation. Ideas once dismissed as radical are now gaining a hearing. Fights are raging within the Democratic Party, and on the political left. And

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from The Atlantic

The Atlantic5 min readPolitics
Planned Parenthood Makes a Huge Bet
The women’s-health organization will stop taking money from Title X, a government family-planning program, in light of a new rule that bars doctors from making referrals for abortion procedures.
The Atlantic4 min readPolitics
Trump Could Win Again
He’s unpopular, scandalous, and a bigot, and we may be sliding into a recession. But that might not matter.
The Atlantic8 min readPolitics
Why Conservatives Are Turning Against Higher Education
This article was updated on August 20, 2019 at 5:53pm A native of small-town Missouri who excelled at Stanford and Yale Law School, Josh Hawley, the junior senator from Missouri, is keenly aware of how higher education can serve as a springboard into