The Atlantic

The Choice Facing a Declining United States

America can try to hold on to global hegemony as it slips from its grasp—or it can learn from Britain's mistakes.
Source: Reuters

In Nairobi National Park, a succession of concrete piers rises over the heads of rhinos and giraffes, part of a $13.8 billion rail project that will link Kenya’s capital with the Indian Ocean. It’s a project with the ambition and scale of global leadership, and the site safety posters are in the language of its engineers and builders: Chinese.

Four hundred miles further north, in one of Kenya’s city-sized refugee camps, there’s another sign of what global leadership used to look like: sacks of split peas, stamped ; a handful

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