The Guardian

The principles that made Aung San Suu Kyi an icon are what undid her | Mary Dejevsky

The Myanmar leader’s fall from grace is partly because we made the mistake of putting her on such a high pedestal
Aung San Suu Kyi. ‘Those who stand up for their cause can also be awkward and uncomfortable individuals.’ Photograph: Ann Wang/Reuters

The image of Myanmar’s leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, was one of untrammelled moral rectitude, remote dignity and immense personal authority – until very recently. The UN report released this week on the violence against the Rohingya minority found that, while she had no power over the generals it named as responsible, she had “not used her de facto position as head of government, nor her moral authority, to stem or prevent the unfolding events in Rakhine”.

It said that her government – she is

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