Business Today

"I want people coming to stay longer in India"

Less than a year after taking charge, K.J. Alphons, Minister of State (Independent Charge) for Tourism, launched a revamped Incredible India campaign. Alphons, who is candid about the issues facing India's tourism sector and wants to reduce the role of the government to just promoting tourism, speaks about efforts to make tourism hip again in a conversation with Business Today's Manu Kaushik and Joe C. Mathew. Edited excerpts:

What has been the focus of Incredible India 2.0? What are you trying to achieve with that?

A: K.J. Alphons: I want people to come and see India. We are an amazing country. The new slogan is not just inviting people to see and experience India; we are saying that come to India and get transformed. We believe anybody who comes to India will go back transformed. The promotions relate to yoga, Ayurveda, wildlife, cuisine and luxury. We released four movies on them. In one month of the yoga [movie], three weeks of wildlife, and one week of luxury, we had 65 million views. We are redefining promotion. Our promotion on Ayurveda is among the top three globally. We are beating Apple and Samsung in this game. In another two weeks, I will have 100 million views.

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