The New York Times

The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

JILL LEPORE’S NEW BOOK ON THE AMERICAN PAST TAKES IN THE ENTIRE PICTURE, FAILURES AS WELL AS SUCCESSES.

“These Truths: A History of the United States"By Jill Lepore932 pages. W.W. Norton & Company. $39.95.

It isn’t until you start reading it that you realize how much we need a book like this one at this particular moment. “These Truths,” by Jill Lepore — a professor at Harvard and a staff writer at The New Yorker — is a one-volume history of the United States, constructed around a traditional narrative, that takes you from the 16th to the 21st century. It tries to take in almost everything, an impossible task, but I’d be hard-pressed to think she could have crammed more into these 932 highly readable pages. It covers the history of political thought, the fabric of American social life over the centuries, classic “great man” accounts of contingencies, surprises, decisions, ironies and character, and the vivid experiences of those previously marginalized: women, African-Americans, Native Americans, homosexuals. It encompasses interesting takes on democracy and technology, shifts in demographics, revolutions in economics and the very nature of modernity. It’s a big sweeping book, a way for us to take stock at this point in the journey, to look back, to remind us who we are

This article originally appeared in .

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from The New York Times

The New York Times4 min read
How to Avoid Being Fleeced When Using a Credit Card Overseas
Merchants frequently try to confuse and bulldoze foreign travelers into paying a stiff markup on credit card charges. But you can fight back.
The New York Times4 min readSelf-Improvement
Stress Can Make You Sick. Take Steps to Reduce It.
In his new book, “The Stress Solution,” Dr. Rangan Chatterjee offers advice on countering the damaging effects of chronic stress.
The New York Times4 min read
He Lifted All Readers in His Path
With his prodigious memory and ardor for literature, the uncompromising highbrow Harold Bloom sought to hoist his readers up to the level of what he saw as the greatest books.