NPR

Could A Ban On Fishing In International Waters Become A Reality?

As the United Nations meets to discuss high-seas biodiversity, scientists and activists say that while a fishing ban could profoundly help protect sea life, it may also be impossible to enforce.
Large fishing boats use voluminous trawl nets, longlines miles in length, and other industrial gear to catch fish on the high seas, which can destroy habitats and kill other sea life. Source: Christopher Costello

The jury is in on marine reserves: They work. Research has repeatedly shown that fish numbers quickly climb following well-enforced fishing bans, creating tangible benefits for fishers who work the surrounding waters. In fact, many experts believe fishing will only be sustainable if marine reserves are expanded significantly.

That's why some activists and scientists are now discussing the idea of creating a marine reserve so big it would cover most of the ocean. Specifically, they want fishing banned in international waters.

Also called the high seas, international waters include all parts of the ocean 200 miles or more from sovereign land. That's about 58 percent of the ocean's surface. In this largely unregulated area,

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