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At Least 12 Dead In Carolinas And 'The Worst Flooding Is Yet To Come' In Some Areas

Florence is now a tropical depression, but major flooding will continue, the National Weather Service says. At least 12 people have died in the storm and its aftermath. That number's expected to rise.
Persistent rain worsens the flood conditions in Castle Hayne. Rains have been relentless, and Florence continues to dump a "catastrophic" amount of water in its path. Source: Phyllis B. Dooney for NPR

Updated 5:15 a.m. ET Sunday

Florence weakened to a tropical depression Sunday morning, the National Hurricane Center said, but flooding continued to be a major danger throughout the Carolinas.

In its 5 a.m. update, the agency said the storm was moving west and had picked up a little speed to 8 mph with sustained winds of 35 mph.

The storm's death toll climbed to 12 on Saturday, a number that's expected to rise.

More flooding is expected, with central and western North Carolina and southwestern Virginia likely facing another 5 to 10 inches of rain; southern North Carolina and northern South Carolina facing 4 to 6 inches with 8 inches in some areas; and 2 to 4 inches with isolated areas seeing 6 inches

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