The Christian Science Monitor

Ten years later: Are we readier to counter a Lehman-style crash?

A decade ago, with America’s housing market crashing and credit markets in disarray, economists and leaders at the Federal Reserve predicted the US economy would keep growing.

When, instead, the United States plunged into its worst recession in seven decades, it caused not only a crisis in banking and housing, but also added to widening distrust in experts and forced economists to take a good long look in the mirror.

The result, 10 years after a mid-September Monday when the collapse of the investment firm Lehman Brothers roiled world markets: a profession

Seeing the forest instead of treesSafer, but not fool-proofMail the money

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