NPR

A Guatemalan Village Tells The Story of Immigration To The U.S.

Farmers in rural, western Guatemala have compelling reasons to attempt the dangerous journey to the U.S. Drought is stunting the corn crop, and one season's failure means no income for a family.
Sara Cano with five of her six kids in front of her home in San Antonio Las Nubes, Huehuetenango, Guatemala. Her husband, Oscar Leonel Lopez, tried to immigrate to the U.S. but was deported back home. Source: Marisa Penaloza

The population of the province of Huehuetenango, Guatemala, is majority Maya. It's a remote region near the border with Mexico, about a seven-hour drive from the capital, Guatemala City, on roads that are breathtakingly steep — often unpaved and very narrow.

The village of San Antonio Las Nubes is high up in the Sierra de los Cuchumatanes mountain range in Huehuetenango. It's name — San Antonio of the Clouds — comes from the vast blanket of fog that wraps around the trees.

Thirty-two-year-old Oscar Leonel Lopez has lived here his whole life, except for a couple of months when he attempted to migrate to the United States in February last

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