NPR

Amid Kavanaugh Allegations, Rethinking The Common Refrain 'Boys Will Be Boys'

Justifying misbehavior among young men by saying "boys will be boys" spreads confusion about how boys and young men should act, says the president of the American Men's Studies Association.
Allegations against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh have ignited a debate on how boys should behave. (StockSnap/Pixabay)

The allegations against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh have ignited a national debate about what constitutes acceptable behavior by boys.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with University of Northern Colorado sociology professor Cliff Leek (@Cliff_Leek), president of the American Men’s Studies Association and author of the forthcoming book “Boy oh Boy,” a collection of 30 coming-of-age stories from successful male figures.

“The sorts of things and behaviors that we reinforce as manly to boys are not what we expect from good men,” says Leek, who argues that justifying misbehavior among young men by saying “boys will be boys” spreads confusion about how boys and

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