The Atlantic

Employers Are Looking for ‘Influencers’ Within Their Own Ranks

Some businesses, concerned about unreliable social-media personalities, are turning to their own employees and customers to serve as brand ambassadors.
Source: guteksk7 / Shutterstock / Thanh Do / The Atlantic

On August 19th, a appeared on the Macy’s website. It opens with a light-flooded room, in which a young woman sits in front of a mirror. “Macy’s” is spelled out on the wall in gold, glittering cardboard letters attached to a string with clothespins, like decorations at a child’s birthday party. The woman—Isabel Campbell, a digital assistant in the petites department at Macy’s—. “I am a very relaxed type of girl—I love to just shop around, have brunch with my friends,” she says. “And this”—gesturing to her clothes—“is my go-to outfit: an oversized sweater from Free People and a Free People jean skirt.” If you like what you see, you can click the links that appear nearby to buy similar products from

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