The Guardian

My mother and I speak different languages. Technology has brought us together | Jessie Tu

Writing letters to my mother feels liberating – even if simple sentences often get lost in translation
‘I hadn’t been able to tell her what I wanted out of life. How I felt when I fell in love and when I fell out of love and all the emotions in between, because I had no words for them in Mandarin’ Photograph: DaniloAndjus/Getty Images

Last week, I wrote a letter to my mother on my computer. It began as an enumerate sort of text, detailing my day – I woke up, I went to yoga, I ate a bowl of porridge, I drove to work – but then quickly spiralled into an unbiddable series of paragraphs about my views on gender politics, feminism and the dire state of our country’s incarceration system. 



I highlighted the text, then cut and pasted it into Google

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from The Guardian

The Guardian2 min read
Laurie Anderson: 'It's A Great Time To Be Creating New Realities'
The avant-garde pioneer’s virtual-reality installation To the Moon is coming to Manchester international festival
The Guardian3 min readPolitics
Sound Of Hong Kong's Defiance Reverberates In Beijing
Beijing’s public support for Hong Kong leader likely hides private fury, but letting her go would be another humiliation
The Guardian3 min read
I Was Forced Out Of My Job After Having A Baby. Then I Was Silenced By An NDA | Anonymous
I faced maternity discrimination and was pushed into signing an NDA. An MPs’ report shows my story is all too common