The Christian Science Monitor

In Pakistan, she sees the value in children who ‘are never seen or heard’

Zeba Husain founded Mashal School to provide education and solace for the many street children in Pakistan’s capital. Source: MAIJA LIUHTO

On the outskirts of Islamabad, Pakistan, there is a neighborhood a world away from the luxury cars, private schools, and orderly streets in the capital. Here, around a Sufi shrine called Bari Imam, mud-brick houses line the dirt roads, little boys with dirty faces offer to wash cars for less than a dollar, and girls in torn dupattas, long scarves, try to sell flowers to people who come to pray at the shrine.

But not far from the shrine is a school that provides education and solace to these street children, who otherwise would face abuse by gangs that operate in the area. Zeba Husain, the founder of Mashal School, is greeted enthusiastically by the students as she walks in the gates with a smile. There is a never-ending flow of people to her office –

The school at firstStudents’ desire to help othersThree other groups supporting education

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