NPR

'All You Can Ever Know' Offers A Personal Account Of Transracial Adoption

Nicole Chung's memoir is never myopic and, ultimately, it's universal: a story about families, learning to grapple with our own identities, and figuring out where we belong.
Source: PR

The story Nicole Chung was told about her adoption was always the same: "Your birth parents had just moved here from Korea. They thought they wouldn't be able to give you the life you deserved."

Her adoptive parents were white Catholics living in Oregon who told the story with joy: explaining that Chung was born 10 weeks premature, that her birth parents worried she'd struggle all her life, that they believed adoption was the best thing for her.

As a child, Chung, the editor-in-chief of and a founding member of, accepted this story much in the same way all of us accept the narratives presented to us about the lives our families had before us. Chung writes that the story was a "kind of faith, one to rival any religion, informing our beliefs about ourselves and our families and our place in the world." Though she liked the prepackaged myth of her birth parents as selfless, wanting only the best for their daughter, as she became older, Chung started to wonder if the story was the entire truth.

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