The Atlantic

Bad News for People Who Can’t Remember Names

Everyone’s social nightmare might have lasting effects on relationships.
Source: Raquel Lonas / Getty

A good friend of one of my good friends forgets me every time I see him. We’ve hung out four times in the past several years, and on each occasion he’s greeted me with a beaming smile and an outstretched hand. “Hi, I’m Jerkface,” he says. (Jerkface’s name has been changed to avoid unnecessary shaming.)

“Hi, yes,” I reply. “We saw each other at that bar that one time, and at our friend’s apartment before that.”

“Oh, yeahhh,” he says, clearly not remembering.

Nothing knocks you down a notch like learning you don’t make much of an impression. Nevertheless, people forget each other all the time. It happens between the newest acquaintances and the

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