The Atlantic

How Much Would You Pay for a Prayer?

In India, thousands are embracing apps that allow them to pay for a ritual to be performed on their behalf.
Source: Rami Niemi

How can I get a divine intervention for my career? That’s the question Ravi Ganne, a young investment banker in Bangalore, typed into Google seven years ago. His search results led him to the website of a new company called ePuja. For about $15, the start-up would have a puja, a Hindu devotional-prayer ritual, performed on his behalf at one of its many in-network temples.

A few clicks

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