Working Mother

20 Simple Ways a Working Mom Can Improve Her Marriage

Married couple

Get ready to bring your relationship back to its glory days.

Photo: iStock

Marriage is hard no matter how full your full-time job is. So hard, sometimes, that we wake up and wonder why we signed that damn piece of paper in the first place. Working moms have a unique set of challenges in keeping a healthy partnership. We have less time, more obligations, (usually) more stressors, more responsibilities and, unfortunately, a lot more distractions. Ever sit down and realize you can’t actually remember the last time you and your significant other went out on a real, grown-up date? Or even—dare I say it—had sex? Yeah, you’re not alone.

Sure, not all couples are a perfect match. Some relationships are simply not made to stand the stand the test of time, and that’s OK. But if you are confident in your life partner and want to get the most out of your life together, here are 20 little things every working mom can do to improve her marriage. The best part: they really, really work.

1. Designate a “safe word” for arguments.

Not a 50-Shades-type safe word, one for when you’re in a fight that’s going nowhere, causing you undue

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