The Atlantic

Robyn’s Honey: The Thrill Is Gone, and That’s Okay

The cult pop star’s first album in eight years offers a delicate meta-take on dance history—and human emotion.
Source: Heji Shin

The sort of anthems that made Robyn famous speed time up. “,” “,” and “” draw on bittersweet feelings, but from their first synthetic whirl of notes—as sad-happy verses open up into sad-happy choruses—they’re also a rush. Sing the tunes en masse and it’s fun like a roller coaster is fun, like a thriller movie is fun, or like a night of drinking, remembered later only in patches, is fun. You just.

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