Popular Science

Blow flies help us solve murders—but climate change is forcing them out

Rising temperatures are driving these crime-fighting insects from their homes.
A chrysomya megacephala, commonly known as a blow fly.

A chrysomya megacephala, commonly known as a blow fly.

Muhammad Mahdi Karim

Climate change has spurred the spread of invasive insects that devour crops, destroy homes, and spread disease. Now, rising temperatures are driving cadaver-eating blow flies to migrate north in search of cooler weather, with consequences for forensic scientists who rely on them to solve crimes.

Blow flies are drawn to dead bodies, both human and animal. They land on a fresh corpse within minutes of death. The females the or of suspected killers.

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