History of War

MEMORIES OF THE ‘PHANTOM MAJOR’

hisofwaruk1804_article_081_01_01
hisofwaruk1804_article_081_01_02
hisofwaruk1804_article_081_01_03
hisofwaruk1804_article_081_01_04

On the night of 26 July 1942 an incongruous column of heavily armed jeeps bumped across the Libyan desert. There were 18 vehicles in all, commanded by Major David Stirling, the 26-year-old Scot who the previous July had convinced Middle East Command in Cairo to allow him to raise a 66-strong unit called L Detachment of the Special Air Service Brigade.

Initially formed as a parachute unit,

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from History of War

History of War6 min read
Emael Fortress First Strike Of The Fallschirmjager
On the 10 May 1940, the Germans commenced their attack on the Netherlands, Belgium and France. The main thrust of the attack was going to come through the Belgium Ardennes and head towards the French coast. The Germans wanted to trick the Allies into
History of War1 min read
Fighting Through To Hitler’s Germany
Author: Mark Forsdike Publisher: Pen & Sword Books Ltd Landing on Sword beach on D-Day, 1 Suffolks had the crucial task of capturing several fortified German positions, including one codenamed Hillman, which dominated the local area. Under the inspi
History of War3 min read
“24 Hours That Saved Europe”
As German forces rapidly advanced, the British-held supply base at Arras was in danger of being surrounded. On 21 May 1940 the British launched a counter-attack with just 2,000 infantrymen and 74 tanks. David Willey explains, “General Harold Franklyn