The Guardian

Football’s super-rich play the game by their own rules | David Goldblatt

The Football Leaks revelations show how little the views of fans and regulators matter
Paris Saint-Germain’s star striker Neymar is paid a €375,000 bonus for greeting and waving to fans. Photograph: Anne-Christine Poujoulat/AFP/Getty Images

WikiLeaks shone a light on the duplicity of US foreign policy. The Panama Papers laid bare the network of offshore banking, tax havens and legal loopholes that allows the global super-rich, political dynasties in authoritarian states and organised crime to (the bounds of all three being pretty fluid) hide their capital. But it may just be that a website with a trove of insider contacts, astounding documents and very secure servers, will be the best guide to the malfeasance of the global economy and our

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