WellBeing

The good fight

No one can deny Tracey Spicer has guts. If you were one of the 1.5 million viewers who watched her in her nowfamous TEDx talk in 2013 ceremoniously remove all her makeup, kick off her high heels and strip off the tight-fitting suit she was expected to wear throughout her career, you’d know she has courage. When Spicer finds something she believes in, she’ll back herself all the way.

But for anyone who knows her 30-year history in the media, and in particular her fight for women’s rights to return to work and — shock, horror — the TV screen after motherhood, the removal of her clothes on stage to highlight the pressure women feel to look and behave a certain way would come as no surprise.

Spicer has been silently — and not so silently — shaking up the media’s representation of women for a long time now. In fact, she’s riding what she calls the “fourth wave” of feminism.

This is not a new battle for the radio, TV and newspaper journalist, however — she has been fighting for a long time. And, despite the relentless trolls and the reluctance of the “old guard” media to change, she’s not going to

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