WellBeing

The art of love and money

Money seems more likely to infect our relationships with fights, fears and shame than to spark joy. But money shouldn’t be the greatest cause for breakups and marriage breakdowns. How you choose to approach your co-financial life can be your relationship’s greatest strength.

If your relationship is suffering from the emotional debt of not daring to talk honestly about how you feel, think and interact with your money, then consider changing the way you both approach co-managing it.

John Armstrong writes in his book How to Worry Less About Money, “The goal of a relationship is that both people flourish together. And, because money is a crucial ingredient in flourishing, it’s a crucial ingredient in marriage.”

We should follow our hearts when we are on the quest to find the perfect partner; however, we should not be afraid to consider the financial implications and explore how to approach the topic of money together.

Money cannot buy a happy relationship. But, as a resource, it can enable you to use your talents to make a difference and to focus on the things you and your partner really care about. It can help you to build a future that will bring meaning and fulfilment

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