The Atlantic

How Pink Salt Took Over Millennial Kitchens

It’s not healthier for you. It doesn’t technically come from the Himalayas. But pink salt’s appeal has exploded nonetheless.
Source: Morinka / Shutterstock

For decades, I was under the impression that salt is white. Table salt, sea salt, kosher salt, whatever—the sky is blue, the salt is white, and that’s just how things are. Then, about three years ago and for reasons that were not clear to me at the time, much of the salt I encountered was suddenly pink. I bought some pink salt, but I didn’t know why. It seemed like the right thing to do.

Specifically, almost all pink salt is branded as Himalayan. Most of that comes from the enormous Khewra Salt Mine, situated between Islamabad and Lahore in Punjab, a bit south of the actual Himalayas in Pakistan. Those salt veins, formed when ancient seabeds were pushed inland, are hundreds of millions of years old, and that the site of the mine was originally discovered by it will help you regulate your blood sugar and sleep cycle. You can buy for about 30 bucks at Williams Sonoma.

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from The Atlantic

The Atlantic8 min readPolitics
The U.S. Is About to Do Something Big on Hong Kong
Protests there have demonstrated the enduring appeal of American values and power. But can Washington live up to that promise?
The Atlantic9 min read
The Plot Against Persona
It’s preposterous for Lana Del Rey and other musicians to deny that they’re playing characters. But in this pop landscape, that denial might be necessary.
The Atlantic3 min readPolitics
The Atlantic Politics Daily: Eat Meat, Not Too Much, Mostly Plants
Is eating meat following plastic straws onto the front lines of the country’s various culture wars? Plus: The question Elizabeth Warren didn’t want to answer.