The Atlantic

Pushing Back the Darkness in Pittsburgh

On the first night of Hanukkah, I returned to the synagogue where my husband is a rabbi for the first time since the October shooting.
Source: Jeffrey Myers / AP

I was walking somewhere I was afraid to go, even though I had been there many times before. But I had not been to a religious service at the Tree of Life synagogue—where my husband is the rabbi of New Light Congregation—in more than 30 days, since a shooter killed 11 people in that spot.

Though it was not quite 6 o’clock on Sunday evening, the first night of Hanukkah, the winter darkness enveloped my neighborhood. I walked past the shopping district, the dry cleaners, my dentist’s office, and the home of my husband’s college roommate. All was familiar, yet I

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