The Atlantic

Man in the Empty Suit and the Sad Side of Time Travel

Sean Ferrell’s second novel addresses what it means to really look at yourself, literally.
Source: Soho Press

, by Sean Ferrell, follows a world-weary time traveler who celebrates every birthday by visiting the same spot in the far future. Once a year he gathers with scores of selves at an abandoned New York City hotel, each self from a different year of his life—some older and inscrutable, some younger and insufferable. The story begins when the central character, now in his 39th year, arrives at the party and stumbles upon an inexplicably murdered self from six months in the future.

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from The Atlantic

The Atlantic5 min readPolitics
How Black Suffragettes Subverted the Domestic Sphere
Anna Julia Cooper was among the educators who emphasized the power of communal care as a method of addressing larger structural ills.
The Atlantic5 min read
The Cheap Thrills of Why Women Kill and The Kitchen
A new TV show and film tell similarly shallow stories about mistreated wives finding empowerment by getting revenge on their husbands.
The Atlantic6 min readPolitics
Hong Kong’s Protests Have Cemented Its Identity
Chinese authorities have long sought to sway Hong Kongers, but more and more, residents of the city see it as being distinct from the mainland.