The New York Times

Congratulations on the Promotion. But Did Science Get a Demotion?

A number of recent news articles have brought renewed attention to financial conflicts of interest in medical science. Physicians and medical administrators had financial links to companies that went undeclared to medical journals even when they were writing on topics in which they clearly had monetary interests.

Most agree such lapses damage the medical and scientific community. But our focus on financial conflicts of interest should not lead us to ignore other conflicts that may be equally or even more important. Such biases need not be explicit, like fraud.

“I believe a more worrisome source of research bias derives from the researchers seeking

This article originally appeared in .

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from The New York Times

The New York Times4 min read
A Bawdy Novel Considers the Tragic Absurdities of Lebanon's Civil War
(Books of The Times) Standing on his balcony, Pavlov, the 20-year-old man at the center of Rawi Hage’s fourth novel, “Beirut Hellfire Society,” hears from the street below “tales of combat deaths, sniper deaths, deaths by misadventure, old age, accid
The New York Times5 min read
Finding Amelia Earhart's Plane Seemed Impossible. Then Came a Startling Clue.
(Science Times) Robert Ballard is the finder of important lost things. In 1985, he discovered the Titanic scattered beneath the Atlantic Ocean. He and his team also located the giant Nazi battleship Bismarck and, more recently, 18 shipwrecks in the B
The New York Times7 min read
A Pop-Culture Glossary for 'Once Upon a Time in Hollywood'
Quentin Tarantino’s film is filled with references to TV shows, movies and other totems of midcentury Los Angeles. We explain who’s who and what’s what.