Bloomberg Businessweek

An Unhappy New Year For Restaurants

The holiday hiring crunch may be over, but finding workers won’t be much easier in 2019

Every autumn, retailers hire large numbers of seasonal workers to handle the rush of holiday business. Then, after the new year kicks in, many of those temps typically rejoin the ranks of low-skilled job seekers, eager for work and often willing to accept meager pay. That cycle has long been good for the restaurant industry, with food preparation workers and servers receiving mean annual wages that were half those of the U.S. average, according to May 2017 U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics data.

It may not work out that way in 2019.

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