Los Angeles Times

Editorial: Prayer at government meetings violates the 1st Amendment

When citizens attend a government meeting, they shouldn't have to be subjected to official prayer, whether it takes the form of a petition to God "in Jesus' name" or a more ecumenical invocation. Inevitably a prayer offered as part of a public proceeding - whether it's a city council meeting or a state legislative hearing or any other such gathering - will make some listeners feel excluded. That runs counter to the 1st Amendment's prohibition of an "establishment

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