The Guardian

Why can companies still silence us with mandatory arbitration? | Moira Donegan

More than 55% of the American workforce is now subject to mandatory arbitration. This system of private courts must be abolished
‘Google employees, like their counterparts at a ballooning number of American companies, were subject to forced arbitration.’ Photograph: Jeenah Moon/Reuters

When it was revealed in October that Andy Rubin received a $90m exit package after being forced to resign over a credible sexual harassment claim, Google employees around the world walked out in protest. They were disgusted at what appeared to be a reward for bad behavior, and they wanted more accountability for members of management. But they were also angry at the strategy that the company used to keep harassment claims a secret: forced arbitration.

Google employees, like their counterparts at a ballooning number of American companies, were subject to forced arbitration – meaning that if they had a conflict with their employer, such as wage theft, race discrimination, or in this case, sexual harassment, they

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from The Guardian

The Guardian23 min readPolitics
Inside The Bizarre, Bungled Raid On North Korea's Madrid Embassy
In February, a gang of armed men took a North Korean official hostage and demanded that he defect. When he refused, their plan fell apart, and they fled. Who were they, and why did they risk everything on this wild plot? By Giles Tremlett
The Guardian4 min readSociety
Russia Investigated Disappearance Of Suspected US Spy As Possible Murder
Oleg Smolenkov hadn’t been seen after he went on holiday in 2017, but Russian authorities concluded he had fled abroad
The Guardian2 min readSociety
Do We Need LGBTQ Banks?
The first credit union specifically tailored to LGBTQ customers has opened in the US. Would more of them help end financial discrimination?