The Guardian

'Irish history is moving rapidly': backlash to abortion law fails to emerge

Besides a fleeting protest in Galway, abortion has become available in 22 of Ireland’s 26 counties with barely a fuss
People in Dublin celebrate the result of the Irish abortion referendum in May 2018. Photograph: Paul Faith/AFP/Getty Images

Ireland voted by a landslide to legalise abortion – but turning that social revolution into medical reality has fallen largely on the shoulders of just 200 GPs.

That is the approximate number, representing 5% of all general practitioners, that have signed up to perform the service which started rolling out on 1 January.

Ethical qualms, doubts about clinical readiness and fear of protests have deterred the rest, leaving

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