The New York Times

Why Do People Fall for Fake News?

This article originally appeared in The New York Times.

ARE THEY BLINDED BY THEIR POLITICAL PASSIONS? OR ARE THEY JUST INTELLECTUALLY LAZY?

What makes people susceptible to fake news and other forms of strategic misinformation? And what, if anything, can be done about it?

These questions have become more urgent in recent years, not least because of revelations about the Russian campaign to influence the 2016 United States presidential election by disseminating propaganda through social media platforms. In general, our political culture seems to be increasingly populated by people who espouse outlandish or demonstrably false claims that often align with their political ideology.

The good news is that psychologists and other social scientists are working hard to understand what prevents people from seeing through propaganda. The bad

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