The Atlantic

In The Kid Who Would Be King, Arthurian Legend Meets Harry Potter

Joe Cornish’s fantasy-adventure film is a delightful, modern take on the popular “chosen one” narratives that have long dominated storytelling.
Source: Fox

At the beginning of , Britain is inexorably divided. What has sown such chaos in the country? It’s unclear, but the newspaper headlines scream about war, impending catastrophe, and a future even more doomed than the present. Reading this, you’d be forgiven for thinking Joe Cornish’s new film is a sober piece of nonfiction, but it’s actually a delightful modern fantasy: a recasting of classic Arthurian myth via a group of middle-school adventurers. In , Britain’s turmoil can be undone only by

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