NPR

Shutdown Highlights That Many Americans Don't Have Enough Saved For A Rainy Day

Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson talks with Jeanne Fisher, a financial planner, about how much people should be saving for emergencies.
In this Thursday, Nov. 27, 2014, file photo, a woman pays for merchandise at a Kohl's department store in Sherwood, Ark. (Danny Johnston/AP)

Federal workers affected by the partial government shutdown are set to miss a second paycheck this week, putting many in a precarious financial situation if they don’t have savings for a rainy day.

Almost 60 percent of Americans have less than, meaning an emergency expense would put many people in debt. That may seem like a large share of the population, but , a financial planner at ARGI Investment Services, says that number doesn’t surprise her at all.

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