WellBeing

For love & money

For some people, money is a taboo topic — it’s an emotive issue they just aren’t comfortable talking about. And that’s understandable. After all, money has divided families, ruined relationships and even started wars. Not enough of it and people go hungry; too much of it can equate to gross imbalances of power on a global scale. Love it or loathe it, have too much or too little of it, one thing is certain: money is the cold, hard currency that defines much of the way we live.

So it makes good sense to talk about it, especially in relationships. It’s essential to have an open and honest dialogue about finances, as there will be issues about money couples need to work through. One person might earn far more than the other or have more assets. Some couples can also have dissimilar attitudes and values around money, as well as different spending habits.

In intimate relationships money can impact on so many things, especially self-esteem. Lea Schodel, CEO and founder of Wealthy, the Mindful Wealth movement, says there are many big issues around money in relationships. “Money brings up a lot of shame and guilt

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