The Guardian

Africans who fought for British army paid less than white soldiers

Document reveals more than 500,000 black soldiers were underpaid in second world war‘We were abandoned’: the Kenyan soldier forgotten by Britain
Eusebio Mbiuki and Gershon Fundi, two veterans of Britain’s King’s African Rifles, pay their respects to fallen comrades at a war graves cemetery near Mount Kenya. Photograph: Jack Losh

More than half a million black African soldiers who fought in the British army during the second world war were paid up to three times less than their white counterparts, a newly unearthed document has revealed, prompting calls for an investigation and the government to compensate surviving veterans.

The document, buried in Britain’s national archives, reveals how the government systematically discriminated against African soldiers, paying white personnel – even those living in African colonies and serving alongside African soldiers in British colonial units – far more than their black counterparts.

The international development secretary, Penny Mordaunt, acknowledged that inequalities existed in the past.

Labour MPs are calling for a government inquiry into the matter. On Wednesday, Wayne David, the

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