The Christian Science Monitor

'The Darkest Year' explores how Americans adapted to World War II

The federal government’s internment of approximately 120,000 Japanese-Americans during World War II is regarded as a shameful episode in American history. But in a February 1942 radio address, Los Angeles Mayor Fletcher Bowron, a vocal proponent of relocating and incarcerating people of Japanese descent and their American-born children, predicted that “those little men who prate of civil liberties against the interest of the nation and the safety of the people will be forgotten

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